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San Francisco and Oakland, California

37.8N 122.2W

February 8th, 2011 Category: Snapshots

USA - February 1st, 2011

This orthorectified image focuses on San Francisco, California. The city appears as a bright white area on the left side of the image. Across from San Francisco is the city of Oakland.

Several bodies of water can be seen, including the Pacific Ocean to the west, the San Pablo Bay to the north, and the San Francisco Bay to the south. Several bridges are visible as white lines crossing the bays.

California Coast from San Francisco to Point Reyes Peninsula

38.0N 122.9W

October 12th, 2010 Category: Snapshots

USA - August 27th, 2010

This orthorectified image shows the coast of the state of California, USA. Part of the city of San Francisco appears as a white area along the shores of the San Francisco Bay, by the right edge. Several bridges are visible as white lines crossing the bay.

Point Reyes, a prominent cape on the Pacific coast of northern California, is also visible in the upper left corner. It is located in Marin County approximately 30 miles west-northwest of San Francisco. The Point Reyes Peninsula is bounded by Tomales Bay on the northeast and Bolinas Lagoon on the southeast. The headland is protected as part of Point Reyes National Seashore.

Sediments in Interconnected San Francisco Bays, California, USA – October 26th, 2009

37.7N 122.4W

October 26th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

California, USA - August 25th, 2009

California, USA - August 25th, 2009

Sediments from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers flow through a group of interconnected bays in California often collectively referred to as the San Francisco Bay, before spilling out into the Pacific Ocean.

Along this path, the sediments actually flow first into Suisun Bay, which then flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which in turn connects at its south end to the true San Francisco Bay.

The cities of this region, including San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose, can be seen as grey areas near and along the shores of the bays.

Point Reyes, the Marin Hills and San Francisco, California

38.0N 122.8W

August 7th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

California, USA - July 3rd, 2009

California, USA - July 3rd, 2009

Water currents in the Pacific Ocean off the west coast of California make interesting patterns as they swirl around Point Reyes (top) and out of the San Francisco Bay (right).

Point Reyes is a prominent cape in Marin County approximately 30 mi (48 km) west-northwest of San Francisco. The term is often applied to the Point Reyes Peninsula, the region bounded by Tomales Bay on the northeast and Bolinas Lagoon on the southeast. The headland is protected as part of Point Reyes National Seashore. In this orthorectified image, Inverness Ridge can be seen running along the peninsula’s northwest-southeast spine.

To the southeast, the city of San Francisco glows at the northern end of the San Francisco Peninsula, with the Pacific Ocean to the west and San Francisco Bay to the east. The Golden Gate Bridge can be seen connecting the peninsula to the Marin Hills in southern Marin County.

Part of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (to the right of the Golden Gate) and the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (above the Bay Bridge) can also be seen.

San Francisco Bay, California, USA

37.7N 122.4W

May 26th, 2009 Category: Rivers

San Francisco Bay, California, USA - May 12th, 2009

San Francisco Bay, California, USA - May 12th, 2009

San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining from approximately forty percent of California, USA, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean.

Technically, both rivers flow into Suisun Bay, which flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which connects at its south end to San Francisco Bay, although the entire group of interconnected bays are often referred to as “San Francisco Bay.”

The Bay covers somewhere between 400 and 1,600 square miles (1,040 to 4,160 square kilometers), depending on which sub-bays (such as San Pablo Bay), estuaries, wetlands, and so on are included in the measurement.

Here, the waters in the bay and sub-bays is tan from sediments. Further inland, the tan, silt-laden rivers stand out easily against the green and brown of the surrounding landscape.

The main part of the Bay measures 3 to 12 miles (5 to 20 km) wide east-to-west and somewhere between 48 miles (77 km) and 60 miles (97 km) north-to-south.