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Rough Appearance of Mauna Kea Volcano in Hawaii, USA – May 4th, 2011

19.8N 155.4W

May 4th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

USA – April 28th, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the slopes of Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano on the island of Hawai`i. Standing 4205 m above sea level, its peak is the highest point in the state of Hawaii.

In its current post-shield state, its lava is more viscous, resulting in a steeper profile. Late volcanism has also given it a much rougher appearance than its neighboring volcanoes; contributing factors include the construction of cinder cones, the decentralization of its rift zones, the glaciation on its peak, and the weathering effects of the prevailing trade winds.

Contrasting Slopes of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA

19.8N 155.4W

July 22nd, 2010 Category: Volcanoes

USA - June 27th, 2010

USA - June 27th, 2010

This orthorectified image shows much of the island of Hawaii, USA. The island is formed by five volcanoes, two of which are prominent here: Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea.

The former occupies the lower half of the image; its caldera is clearly visible in the lower right quadrant. The latter can be seen in the upper right quadrant. Its sides appear rougher than those of Mauna Loa, whose slopes are relatively shallow.

Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea Ringed by Clouds on Hawaii, USA

21.1N 157.2W

July 13th, 2010 Category: Volcanoes

USA - June 29th, 2010

USA - June 29th, 2010

Clouds surround the most of the base of Mauna Loa, one of five volcanoes that form the Island of Hawaii in the aponymous USA state in the Pacific Ocean. The relatively shallow slopes, created by fluid silica-poor lava eruptions, appear dark chocolate brown with some grooves.

Another volcano, Mauna Kea, is visible just north of Mauna Loa. It is also surrounded by clouds on most sides, except for the part where it “connects” to Mauna Loa. It can be distinguished from its neighbor by its slightly lighter and more golden brown color, and its rougher-looking surface.

Volcanoes of Hawaii: Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa and Hualālai – December 14th, 2009

19.8N 155.6W

December 14th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

USA - December 1st, 2009

USA - December 1st, 2009

The island of Hawaii is home to five volcanoes, three of which can be observed here in this orthorectified image. These are, clockwise from the upper right, Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa and Hualālai.

Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano in the post-shield stage of volcanic evolution. Its peak is 13,803 feet (4,207 m) above sea level but 33,476 feet (10,203 m) above its base on the floor of the Pacific Ocean, making it the world’s tallest mountain by this measure. The rounded formations on its flanks are various cinder cones.

Mauna Loa is an active shield volcano, with a volume estimated at approximately 18,000 cubic miles (75,000 km³). Its peak, with an elevation of 13,679 feet (4,169 m), is about 120 feet lower than that of Mauna Kea.

Hualālai is a dormant shield volcano with a peak at 8,271 feet (2,521 m) above sea level, much lower than those of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. Although Hualālai is not nearly as active as nearby Mauna Loa, geologic mapping of the volcano shows that 80 percent of Hualālai’s surface is covered by lava flows no older than about 5,000 years.

Hawaii’s Mauna Kea Volcano, USA

19.8N 155.4W

July 5th, 2009 Category: Volcanoes

Hawaii, USA - June 28th, 2009

Hawaii, USA - June 28th, 2009

Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano in the post-shield stage of volcanic evolution, located in the state of Hawaii, USA. It is one of five volcanoes which together form the island of Hawaii.

The peak of Mauna Kea is 13,803 feet (4,207 m) above mean sea level but 33,476 feet (10,203 m) above its base on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. It is the world’s tallest mountain by this measure, taller than Mount Everest, which is the highest mountain above sea level.

Pu’u Wekiu is the highest of the numerous cinder cones on the summit plateau and the highest point in the state. Various cones are visible in this orthorectified ASAR (radar) image.

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