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The Jade Estuary and the Weser River, Germany

53.5N 8.1E

February 1st, 2010 Category: Rivers

Germany - December 31st, 2009

Germany - December 31st, 2009

The Jade Estuary, Jadebusen in German, is a bay on the North Sea coast of Germany. It was formerly known simply as Jade or Jahde. The Jade is a part of the German Wadden Sea National Parks. The port of Wilhelmshaven is on the western shore of the bay.

About 180 km² (70 mi²) in area, the Jade was largely created by storm floods during the twelfth and sixteenth centuries. During this period it was connected in the East to the river Weser (running from the bottom right corner towards the image center). This connection was closed between 1721 and 1725 by dikes reconnecting Butjadingen to the mainland as a peninsula.

In the West the Jade extended far into the Frisian peninsula. From the early sixteenth century a number of dikes were built against the storm floods and to arable land. The main dike, Ellenser Damm, was built between 1596 and 1615 based on an agreement between the principalities of East Frisia and Oldenburg.

The Weser River Between the Elbe and the Jade Estuary, Germany

53.0N 8.8E

November 15th, 2009 Category: Rivers

Germany - October 22nd, 2009

Germany - October 22nd, 2009

Flowing upwards from the bottom right, the Weser River empties into the North Sea off the coast of Germany. To its right is another rivermouth, that of the Elbe, and to its left is the Jade Estuary, a bay known as Jadebusen in German.

About 180 km² (70 mi²) in area, the Jade was largely created by storm floods during the twelfth and sixteenth centuries. During this period it was connected in the East to the river Weser. This connection was closed between 1721 and 1725 by dikes reconnecting Butjadingen to the mainland as a peninsula.

The 452 km long Weser River passes by the historic port city of Bremen before emptying into the North Sea 50 km further north at Bremerhaven, which is also a seaport. On the opposite (west) bank is the town of Nordenham at the foot of the Butjadingen Peninsula. It is the longest German river whose course lies entirely in German territory to reach the sea.

Southern Italy, Between the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic Seas and the Gulf of Taranto

40.4N 16.4E

November 17th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Italy - October 7th, 2009

Italy - October 7th, 2009

The terrain of southern Italy appears divided in two, between the flatter lands near the Adriatic Coast (above) and the more mountainous terrain towards Tyrrhenian Sea (below).

Upon opening the full image, many cities and towns in the Apulia region appear as tan circular areas on the flatter Adriatic side. The main exception to this generally plain-like topography is the Gargano Peninsula (top left corner), home to Monte Gargano.

Also of note on the peninsula are Lake Lesina  (left) and Lake Varano (right), both dark green, separated from the Adriatic by a thin strip of land and dunes. Sediments line the coast of the peninsula, particularly to the right. Other swirls of sediments are also visible in the full image along the shores of the Gulf of Taranto (right).

Continuing to the right along the shoreline, towns cities such as Bari appear as tan patches amidst the green terrain. On the bottom right, by Apulia’s border with the Basilicata Region, the Basento River spills tan sediments into the Gulf of Taranto.

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