Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Search Results for ""cahora bassa"":

Cahora Bassa Lake on Zambezi River, Mozambique

15.6S 32.1E

January 1st, 2012 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Mozambique - December 24th, 2011

Parallel to the top edge of this image is the Cahora Bassa lake, Africa’s fourth-largest artificial lake, situated in the Tete Province in Mozambique. In Africa, only Lake Volta in Ghana, Lake Kariba, on the Zambezi upstream of Cahora Bassa, and Egypt’s Lake Nasser are bigger in terms of surface water.

The lake is situated on the middle section of the Zambezi River. The middle segment ends where the river enters Lake Cahora Bassa. Formerly the site of dangerous rapids known as Kebrabassa, the lake was created in 1974 by the construction of the Cahora Bassa Dam. Most of the electricity generated by Cahora Bassa, is sold to nearby South Africa.

Cahora Bassa Lake in Tete Province, Mozambique

15.6S 31.8E

June 8th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers, Sediments

Mozambique - April 17th, 2010

Mozambique - April 17th, 2010

The Cahora Bassa lake is Africa’s fourth-largest artificial lake, situated in the Tete Province in Mozambique. In Africa, only Lake Volta in Ghana, Lake Kariba, on the Zambezi upstream of Cahora Bassa, and Egypt’s Lake Nasser are bigger in terms of surface area.

Most of the electricity generated by Cahora Bassa, which is located on the Zambezi River in western Mozambique, is sold to nearby South Africa. In 2006, Cahora Bassa transmitted about 1,920 megawatts of power, but the infrastructure is capable of higher production levels and the company had plans to almost double its output by 2008. In 1994 the total installed capacity in Mozambique was 2,400 MW of which 91 % was hydroelectric.

Cahora Bassa Lake, Mozambique

March 28th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Cahora Bassa Lake, Mozambique - March 24th, 2009

Cahora Bassa Lake, Mozambique - March 24th, 2009

The Cahora Bassa lake is Africa’s fourth-largest artificial lake, situated in the Tete Province in Mozambique. Here, the western part of the lake appears tan from sediments, while the eastern part is green from phytoplankton growth, including various species of green and blue-green algae.

The lake has reached a maximum length and width of approximately 250 km and 38 km respectively, flooding an area of 2,700 km² with an average depth of 20.9 m.

In Africa, only Lake Volta in Ghana, Lake Kariba, on the Zambezi upstream of Cahora Bassa, and Egypt’s Aswan dam are bigger in terms of surface water.

The Cahora Bassa Dam system is the largest hydroelectric scheme in southern Africa with the powerhouse containing 5 x 415MW turbines.

It is one of the three major dams on the Zambezi river system, the others being Kariba and Itezhi-Tezhi (although the latter is not on the main stream of the Zambezi, but on its tributary the Kafue River).

Smoke Between Lakes Malawi and Kariba, Zambia and Malawi

14.1S 32.4E

September 20th, 2012 Category: Fires

Malawi and Zambia – September 3rd, 2012

Smoke from fires in central-southern Africa hovers over the land in Zambia and Malawi between Lake Malawi (upper right, on the Malawi-Mozambique border), Lake Kariba (lower left, on the Zambia-Zimbabwe border) and Lake Bangweulu (upper left). Surrounded by patchy clouds at the lower center is Lake Cahora Bassa, in Mozambique.

Vegetation Index of Mozambique and Zimbabwe

15.6S 32.1E

March 6th, 2012 Category: Vegetation Index

Mozambique - January 4th, 2012

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of parts of Mozambique and Zimbabwe. Visible by the border between the two countries are Lake Kariba (left edge) and Lake Cahora Bassa (above center). Mozambique has a tropical climate with two seasons, a wet season from October to March and a dry season from April to September; in this image, therefore, it is entering the final month of the wet season.

The vegetation index is generally good throughout, as indicated by the green false-coloring. Some areas of high activity (rusty red) can be seen near the coast and in the upper left quadrant, northwest of Lake Cahora Bassa. Some areas of low activity (yellow) are mixed throughout, particularly south of Lake Cahora Bassa.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

December 2019
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

48


Take Action

Widgets