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Geography of Italy’s Veneto Region – December 30th, 2009

45.4N 12.3E

December 30th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Snapshots

Italy - November 30th, 2009

Italy - November 30th, 2009

Veneto is the eighth largest region in Italy, with a total area of 18,398.9 km2 (7,103.9 sq mi). It is located in the north-eastern part of Italy and is bordered by four other Italian regions and Austria. The north-south extension of Veneto is 210 km (130 mi) from the Austrian border to the mouth of the Po and its east-west extension is 195 km (121 mi) from the eastern shore of Lake Garda on the west to the mouth of the River Tagliamento on the east.

Veneto can be divided into four areas, parts of which are all visible in this orthorectified image: the northern Alpine zone, the hill zone, the lower plain and the coastal territory. Twenty-nine% of its surface is mountainous (Carnic Alps, eastern Dolomites and Venetian Prealps). The best known massif in the Dolomites is the Marmolada, while the highest, at 3,342 m (10,960 ft), is the Tofane-massif. The Venetian Prealps are not as high and range between 700 m (2,300 ft) and 2,200 m (7,200 ft).

Fifty-seven% of the Veneto region is covered by the Po Valley, a plain extending from the mountains to the Adriatic Sea, broken only by some low hills: Colli Berici, Colli Euganei, Colli Asolani and Montello, which constitute the remaining 14% of the territory. The Venetian plain itself is subdivided into the higher plain (gravel-strewn and not very fertile) and the lower plain (rich in water sources and arable terrain). The lower plain is both a mainstay of agricultural production and the most populated part of the region.

Several rivers traverse the region: the Po, Adige, Brenta, Bacchiglione, Livenza, Piave, and Tagliamento. The eastern shore of the largest lake in Italy, Lake Garda, belongs to Veneto. The coastline covers approximately 200 km (120 mi), of which 100 km (62 mi) are beaches. The coasts of the Adriatic Sea are characterized by the Venetian Lagoon,  visible near the shores on the right, a flat terrain with ponds, marshes and islands. The Po Delta to the south features sandbars and dunes along the coastline. The inland portion contains cultivable land recently reclaimed by a system of canals and dikes.  The delta is a stopping-point for migratory birds.

Mountains of Sardinia and Corsica – December 23rd, 2009

41.2N 9.2E

December 23rd, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Sardinia and Corsica - November 17th, 2009

Sardinia and Corsica - November 17th, 2009

The islands of  Sardinia (below), belonging to Italy, and Corsica (above), belonging to France, are separated by the Strait of Bonifacio. It is about 7 miles (11 km) wide and divides the Tyrrhenian Sea from the western Mediterranean Sea. The strait is notorious for its weather, currents, shoals, and other obstacles.

Mountains comprise two-thirds of Corsica, forming a single chain, some of which is capped with snow in this image. Monte Cinto is the highest peak at 2,706 metres (8,880 ft), and 20 other summits reach higher than 2,000 metres (6,600 ft).

The coasts of Sardinia (1,849 km long) are generally high and rocky, with ample and deep bays and inlets surrounded by smaller isles. The center of the island is occupied by the Gennargentu, a large mountain massif whose highest peaks are Punta La Marmora (1,834 m), Monte Limbara (1,362 m) and Mount Rasu (1,259 m).

The island’s massifs and plateaus are separated by large alluvial valleys and flatlands; the main plains are the Campidano, located in the southwest between Oristano and Cagliari, and the Nurra, in the northwest.

Mountains of the Gargano Peninsula, Italy

41.7N 15.8E

December 21st, 2009 Category: Lakes

Italy - November 24th, 2009

Italy - November 24th, 2009

The Gargano Peninsula in Italy’s Apulia region occupies the upper left quadrant of this orthorectified image. Monte Gargano forms the backbone of the peninsula. Two lakes can be seen near the shores of the peninsula at the top of the image: Lake Lesina (left) and Lake Varano (right).

The Gargano Peninsula, or promontory, is one of the only mountainous areas in Apulia. Situated at the south-eastern tip of the Italian peninsula, Apulia covers over 19,357 km2 in succession of broad plains and low-lying hills, and is the least mountainous region in the country.

Rome, Between the Apennines and the Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy – December 19th, 2009

41.8N 12.4E

December 19th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Italy - November 17th, 2009

Italy - November 17th, 2009

The city of Rome appears as a grey area near the shores of the Tyrrhenian Sea. It is located in the Lazio (Latium) region of central Italy on the Tiber River. The city is also crossed by another river, the Aniene, which joins the Tiber north of the historic centre.

Although the city centre is about 24 km (14.9 mi) inland from the Tyrrhenian Sea, the city territory extends to the shore, where the south-western district of Ostia is located. The altitude of the central part of Rome ranges from 13 m (43 ft) above sea level (at the base of the Pantheon) to 139 m (456 ft) above sea level (the peak of Monte Mario).

The Commune of Rome covers an overall area of about 1,285 km2 (496 sq mi), including many green areas. Visible near the city in this image are three lakes (from top to bottom): Lake Trasimeno, Lake Bolsena and Lake Bracciano. The Apennine Mountains, capped with snow on a few peaks, are visible in the upper part of the image as well.

Pollino Massif Near Gulf of Taranto, Italy

39.8N 16.2E

December 16th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Italy - November 24th, 2009

Italy - November 24th, 2009

The mountains of the Pollino Massif, in southern Italy, can be seen on the left side of this orthorectified image, near the Gulf of Taranto.  The massif is part of the southern Apennines, on the border between the regions of Calabria and Basilicata.

The Pollino Massif is made of limestone, and therefore subject to erosion phenomena which have created, especially on the Calabrian side, numerous grottoes and canyons.

The main peaks are that of the Pollino (2,248 m) and the Serra Dolcedorme (2,267 m), which overlooks the plain of Sibari. Since 1992 the massif is part of the Pollino National Park.