Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Search Results for ""new orleans"":

Ida Weakens to Tropical Storm and Turns Northward, Poised to Make Landfall on Gulf Coast

November 10th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Tropical Storm Ida - November 9th, 2009

Tropical Storm Ida - November 9th, 2009

Track of Ida - November 9th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Ida

Enhanced image

Enhanced image

As of 3:00 PM CST (2100 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Ida was located near latitude 28.4 north, longitude 88.5 west, or about 60 miles (95 km) southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River and about 165 miles (265 km) south-southwest of Pensacola, Florida.

Ida is moving toward the north near 18 mph (30 km/hr). A reduction in forward speed is expected over Monday night. On the forecast track, the center of Ida should reach the northern gulf coast Monday night. After landfall, Ida is expected to turn eastward on Tuesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph (110 km/hr) with higher gusts. Weakening is expected Monday evening as Ida moves over cooler waters prior to making landfall and is expected to merge with a frontal zone on Wednesday.

Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 200 miles (325 km) from the center. The latest minimum central pressure reported was 991 mb (29.26 inches).

A tropical storm warning remains in effect from Grand Isle, Louisiana eastward to the Aucilla River, Florida, including New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain, meaning that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 24 hours.

Rains from Ida are already moving across the coast within the warning area. Total storm accumulations of 3 to 6 inches, with isolated maximum storm totals of 8 inches, are possible through Wednesday evening from the central and eastern Gulf coast across the southeastern United States into the southern mid-atlantic states.

A dangerous storm tide will raise water levels by as much as 3 to 5 feet above ground level along the coast near and to the east of where the center makes landfall, as well as in areas of onshore flow in southeastern Louisiana. Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves.

Ida Upgraded to Category 2 Hurricane, Moving Into Southern Gulf of Mexico – November 9th, 2009

21.7N 87.1W

November 9th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Storms

Hurricane Ida - November 8th, 2009

Hurricane Ida - November 8th, 2009

Track of Ida - November 8th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Ida

Enhanced image

Enhanced image

As of 3:00 PM CST (2100 UTC), the center of Hurricane Ida was located near latitude 22.2 north, longitude 86.3 west, or about 95 miles (155 km) west-northwest of the western tip of Cuba and about 510 miles (815 km) south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River.

Ida is a category two hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, although the system is forecast to gradually weaken on Monday. Here, the hurricane is visible near the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, with part of the shoreline of Florida visible to the north.

Ida is moving toward the north-northwest near 10 mph (17 km/hr). A gradual turn toward the north and an increase in forward speed are expected during the next 24 to 36 hours. On the forecast track, Ida is expected to cross the Gulf of Mexico Sunday evening and Monday and be near the northern Gulf coast on Tuesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 100 mph (160 km/hr) with higher gusts. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 35 miles (55 km) from the center, and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 140 miles (220 km). The minimum central pressure is 976 mb (28.82 inches).

Ida is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 3 to 5 inches over portions of the Yucatan Peninsula and western Cuba, with possible isolated maximum amounts of 10 inches. Rains will be increasing well in advance of Ida across the central and eastern Gulf coast, but will become steadier and heavier by Monday into Tuesday. Total storm accumulations of 3 to 5 inches with isolated maximum storm totals of 8 inches will be possible through Tuesday from the central and eastern Gulf coast northward into the eastern portions of the Tennessee Valley and the southern Appalachians.

A storm surge could raise water levels by as much as 3 to 4 feet above ground level along the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves.

A hurricane watch remains in effect for the northern Gulf coast from Grand Isle, Louisiana to Mexico Beach, Florida, and the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico from Tulum to Playa del Carmen. This watch does not include the city of New Orleans. A hurricane watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area, generally within 36 hours.

A hurricane warning remains in effect for the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico from Playa del Carmen to Cabo Catoche, meaning that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 24 hours. Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion in the warning area.

A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the Yucatan Peninsula Punta Allen northward to Playa del Carmen and from Cabo Catoche westward to San Felipe, as well as for the Cuban province of Pinar del Rio. A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area within 24 hours. Finally, a tropical storm watch remains in effect for the Isle of Youth.

The Mississippi River Delta, USA – July 14th, 2009

29.9N 90W

July 14th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

USA - June 24th, 2009

USA - June 24th, 2009

The Mississippi River Delta is the modern area of land (the river delta) built up by alluvium deposited by the Mississippi River as it slows down and enters the Gulf of Mexico.

Here, a great deal of golden tan, rust and dark brown colored sediments can observed flowing from the lobes of the delta into the gulf.

The deltaic process has, over the past 5,000 years, caused the coastline of south Louisiana to advance gulfward from 15 to 50 miles (24 to 80 km).

It is a biologically significant region, comprising 3 million acres (12,000 km²) of coastal wetlands and 40% of the salt marsh in the contiguous United States.

It is also a commercially significant region, supporting the economy of New Orleans with significant shipping traffic, providing 16 to 18 % of the US oil supply, and providing 16 % of the US’s fisheries harvest, including shrimp, crabs, and crayfish.

Florida Panhandle Declared Disaster Area

April 23rd, 2009 Category: Floods

Western Florida Panhandle and surroundings - March 30th, 2009

Western Florida Panhandle and surroundings - March 30th, 2009

Storm over Florida Panhandle - March 28th, 2009

Storm over Florida Panhandle - March 28th, 2009

Yesterday, the USA’s President Obama declared nearly a dozen counties in the Florida Panhandle a disaster area.

This declaration is in reference to severe storms, flooding, tornadoes and straight-line winds that battered the Florida Panhandle (and adjacent states). These events occurred on consecutive days from March 29 to April 4 and yet again on April 13.

Here, the main image shows the western part of the Florida Panhandle (right), as well as the shoreline of Alabama (center right), Mississippi (center left) and Louisiana (left), in a cloud-free moment towards the end of the initial 7-day period of rain. Sediments can be seen along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, particularly near New Orleans (left) and St. George’s Sound (right).

The second image shows storm clouds over the panhandle two days earlier, dumping rain on the area. Upon opening the full image, these clouds can be observed covering much of the Mid-west and Northeast, all the way up to the Great Lakes.

The map shows the incredible rainfall took place during the seven-day period ending on March 31. Since that time, in some areas another 8 to 16 inches of rain has fallen, reports the Weather Channel.

Rainfall around Panhandle (source: water.weather.gov)

Rainfall around Panhandle

Tuesday’s order calls for federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. Federal funding will be available to the state, eligible local governments and some nonprofit organizations to repair damage caused by the severe weather. Counties included in the order are Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Liberty, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton and Washington. Federal funding also will be available for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Federal disaster aid has also been requested for Florida’s two neighbors, Alabama and Georgia. In Georgia, a presidential disaster declaration covering 33 counties struck by severe weather and floods was requested by the state’s governor, according to the Associated Press.

In Alabama, a federal disaster declaration was sought by the governor after storms hit 20 counties in south and central parts of the state and caused about $26 million in damage to roads, bridges and public buildings from March 30 to April 3.

Sediments in the Mississippi River Delta – February 11th, 2009

February 11th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Louisiana, USA - February 7th, 2009

New Orleans, Louisiana, USA - February 7th, 2009

The city of New Orleans is located in the Mississippi River Delta in southeastern Louisiana, USA. It was built on the shores of Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi River, which runs through the city. A bridge, the Lake Pontchartrain causeway, is visible across the center of the lake.

Lake Pontchartrain is flanked by Lake Maurepas (left) and Lake Borgne (right). Lake Maurepas appears dark brown due to sediments, which are particularly visible towards its southern shore. The other two lakes are more green in color, due to algae growth.

The thick tan-colored bands reaching to the East from the left side of the image are agricultural areas and canals built along the banks of the Mississippi River (above) and along various bayous.

The Mississippi River continues east, through New Orleans, then bends south, and finally southeast. The area where the river meets the Gulf of Mexico is called the Bird’s Foot Delta, the newest section of the evolving Mississippi River Delta.

Here, the main branch of the Mississippi River splits into three different directions at its mouth: Southwest Pass (west), Pass A Loutre (east) and South Pass (centre). The location of this split is known as the Head of Passes.

The waters of the Mississippi River are golden brown from sediments, which are carried eastward and flow into the Bird’s Foot Delta and the Gulf of Mexico. This entire area appears light brown and green, as a mix of sediments and algae is present.