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Archive for November 13th, 2009

Green Waters Around Djerba and the Kerkennah Islands, Tunisia

33.8N 10.8E

November 13th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Tunisia - September 24th, 2009

Tunisia - September 24th, 2009

The water around the shores of eastern mainland Tunisia, the island of Djerba (below) and the Kerkennah Islands (above), and in the Gulf of Gabès (center left) and Gulf of  Boughrara (below Djerba) show various shades of green, ranging from light and bluish to dark and brownish.

Some of the dark green color may be caused by two species of green algae that have a tendency of invading the coast of Tunisia and are often found around the Kerkennah Islands.

Ridges, Valleys and a Wildfire in the Area of Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

35.9N 83.9W

November 13th, 2009 Category: Fires, Lakes, Rivers

USA - November 8th, 2009

USA - November 8th, 2009

The city of Knoxville in the state of Tennessee, USA, is visible as a greyish circular area in the lower left quadrant, near a series of hills and ridges. These are part of the Appalachian Ridge-and-Valley Province, which consists of a series of elongate and narrow ridges that traverse the upper Tennessee Valley.

Also of note in this image is a wildfire in the upper left quadrant, the smoke from which is blowing northeast. The fire is located in the state of Kentucky, not far from the Tennessee border.

The most substantial Ridge-and-Valley structures in the Knoxville area are Bays Mountain, which runs along the Knox-Blount county line to the south, and Beaver Ridge, which passes through the northern section of the town. The Great Smoky Mountains— a subrange of the Appalachian Mountains— are located approximately 20 miles (32 km) south of Knoxville.

In the southeast part of the city, the French Broad River joins the Holston River to form the Tennessee River. Knoxville is centered around a hilly area along the north bank of the river between its First Creek and Second Creek tributaries.

Two lakes are visible northeast of Knoxville. The first, Douglas Lake, also called Douglas Reservoir, is an artificial lake created by an impoundment of the French Broad River by Douglas Dam. The dam was built by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the early 1940s to control flooding in the Tennessee Valley and provide electricity to rural areas in the region. The lake, easily identified by it’s snakelike bends, is situated only a few miles from the Pigeon Forge/Gatlinburg area and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The second body of water, just north of Douglas Lake, is the Cherokee Reservoir, also known as Cherokee Lake, formed by the impoundment of the Holston River behind Cherokee Dam, which was built for hydroelectric generation and flood control. The reservoir has a surface area of about 28,780 acres (11,650 ha), a flood-storage capacity of 749,406 acre feet (924,379,000 m3), and nearly 400 miles (640 km) of shoreline. In a normal year, the lake water level fluctuates over a range of about 27 feet (8.2 m).

Gulfs of the Sea of Marmara Near Istanbul, Turkey

41.0N 28.9E

November 13th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Turkey- October 22nd, 2009

Turkey- October 22nd, 2009

The Bosphorus Strait, connecting the Black Sea (above) to the Sea of Marmara (below) divides the city of Istanbul, Turkey, in two. The Sea of Marmara has an area of 11,350 km² (280km x 80km) with the greatest depth reaching 1,370 m.

In this orthorectified image, some of the large, indented bays of the sea are visible cutting into the Turkish terrain on either side of the Koroglu Mountains. These include the Gulf of Izmit, center right, whose waters appear light grey, and the Gulf of Gemlik, center bottom. The body of water visible inland between these two gulfs is Lake Iznik.

Rivers and Lakes Near Volgograd, Russia – November 13th, 2009

48.7N 44.5E

November 13th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Russia - October 7th, 2009

Russia - October 7th, 2009

Rivers and lakes seem to divide this image of Russian terrain into four square-like segments. The Volga River, from the center to the right edge, and the Volgograd Reservoir, from the center to the top edge, meet at an almost right-angle.  The reservoir, formed by a dam on the Volga, is thicker and darker blue.

On the other side of the image, the Don River flows across the upper left quadrant towards the center. From the center towards the bottom left is the Tsimlyansk Reservoir or Tsimlyanskoye Reservoir, another artificial lake, this time created by a dam on the Don River.

The rest of the land between the rivers seems mostly devoted to agriculture, with many rectangular fields visible. One large city, however, is visible as a grey area near the center. This is Volgograd, formerly called both Tsaritsyn and Stalingrad, the administrative center of Volgograd Oblast, Russia. It is 80 kilometres long, north to south, situated on the western bank of the Volga River.

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