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Archive for October 27th, 2009

Bodies of Water Along the East Coast of the USA, from New Jersey to South Carolina

35.3N 75.8W

October 27th, 2009 Category: Rivers

USA - September 29th, 2009

USA - September 29th, 2009

Sediments spill from several rivers along the east coast of the United States, from southern New Jersey (top) down to South Carolina (bottom). These are particularly concentrated around the Charleston Harbor in South Carolina (bottom edge), fed by the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, by the mouths of the Cape Fear and the New Rivers in North Carolina,  and in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (center).

Just north of the greenish Pamlico Sound is Albemarle Sound, lined with dark brown sediments. The sound is actually a large estuary on the coast of North Carolina located at the confluence of a group of rivers, including the Chowan and the Roanoke.

To the north of the Albermarle Sound, the Chesapeake Bay appears relatively free of sediments. The Potomac River flows into this bay on the shores of the state of Maryland.

Finally, continuing northward, the shores of the Delaware Bay, a major estuary outlet of the Delaware River separating the states of Delaware and New Jersey, are lined with brown sediments.

Ojos del Salado Volcano and Cerro el Muerto Peak on Chile-Argentina Border – October 27th, 2009

27.1S 68.5W

October 27th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Volcanoes

Argentina and Chile - September 29th, 2009

Argentina and Chile - September 29th, 2009

Many volcanoes can be seen along the border of Chile (left) and Argentina (right) in the upper left quadrant of this orthorectified image. Of particular note are the volcano Ojos del Salado and the mountain Cerro el Muerto, near Laguna Verde, the greyish-looking body of water in that same quadrant.

Laguna Verde is a salt lake in the Andes Mountains of Chile. It lies in the Atacama Region, near San Francisco Pass, surrounded by high mountains. The volcano Ojos del Salado marks the south border of its basin.

Visible directly south of the lake is Cerro el Muerto (sometimes translated as “Death Mountain” or “The Dead One”), a mountain peak that is part of the Andes mountain range. It is also known as the 16th of the largest mountain peaks in the Argentine-Chilean border at 6488 m.

The closest neighboring mountain is Ojos del Salado, visible to the southwest on the edge of the image, a massive stratovolcano in the Andes on the Argentina-Chile border and the highest volcano in the world at 6891 m. It is also the second highest mountain in the Western Hemisphere and the highest in Chile. Its name comes from the enormous deposits of salt that, in the form of lagoons or “eyes”, appear in its glaciers

Due to its location near the Atacama desert, the mountain has very dry conditions with snow only remaining on the peak during winter. Despite the generally dry conditions, there is a permanent crater lake about 100 m in diameter at an elevation of 6390 m on the eastern side of Ojos del Salado. This is most likely the highest lake of any kind in the world.

Tagus and Sado River Estuaries, Southwestern Portugal

38.7N 9.1W

October 27th, 2009 Category: Rivers

Portugal - September 24th, 2009

Portugal - September 24th, 2009

The Tagus River flows southward across Portugal from the top of this image to the city of Lisbon on the Tagus River Estuary below. Here, the estuary appears more brown in color to the north, where the river empties sediments into it.

Another estuary is visible to the southeast; this is formed by the Sado River near the city of  Setúbal. Sediments are also visible here where the river flows into the estuary; however, the waters of the Sado River Estuary appear darker blue than those of the Tagus River Estuary.

Sediments from Daliao River in Liaodong Bay, China

40.1N 121.2E

October 27th, 2009 Category: Rivers

China and North Korea - October 5th, 2009

China and North Korea - October 5th, 2009

Some sediments are present along the west coast of the Korean Peninsula (lower right quadrant), mainly by South Korea, and along the coast of the Bohai Sea (lower left edge) and Shandong Peninsula (bottom left) in northeast China.

The sediments appear most concentrated in Liaodong Bay, one of the three bays forming the Bohai Sea. It borders Hebei province and Tianjin Municipality. Most of these sediments are flowing forth from the Daliao River, which has its estuary on the shores of the bay.