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Archive for October 24th, 2009

The “Meeting of Waters” Near Manaus, Brazil – October 24th, 2009

3.1S 60W

October 24th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Brazil - September 29th, 2009

Brazil - September 29th, 2009

The city of Manaus, the capital of the state of Amazonas in Brazil, is situated at the confluence of the Negro and Solimões Rivers. The Negro River, true to its name, appears to have black waters, while the Solimões (or Upper Amazon) River is light brown.

The two rivers’ confluence is called the Meeting of Waters (in Portuguese, Encontro das Águas). For 6 km (3.7 mi) the rivers’ waters run side by side without mixing (near right edge, southeast of the city). This phenomena is due to differences in temperature, speed and water density of the two rivers. The Negro River flows at near 2 km per hour at a temperature of 22°C, while the  Solimões River flows between 4 to 6 km per hour at a temperature of 28°C.

Lake Geneva by the Chablais and Bernese Alps

46.4N 6.5E

October 24th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Switzerland - September 29th, 2009

Switzerland - September 29th, 2009

Below the snow-dusted Swiss Alps lie (from lower left to upper right) Lake Geneva, Lake Neuchâtel, Lake Thun and Lake Brienz. All are located entirely in Switzerland except for Lake Geneva, which is also shared by France.

Lake Geneva, the largest lake in the image,  lies along the Rhône River. It has an alpine character and is bordered by the Chablais Alps along its southern shore, while the western Bernese Alps lie over its eastern side.

It is the largest natural freshwater lake in western Europe (with a surface area of 582 km²) and the largest body of freshwater in continental Europe in terms of volume (89 km³).

The crescent shape of Lake Geneva, formed by a withdrawing glacier, narrows around Yvoire on the southern shore. It can thus be divided into the “Grand Lac” (Large Lake) to the east and the “Petit Lac” (Small Lake) to the west.

Continuation of Iran’s Central Mountain Ranges into Kerman Province

30.8N 56.5E

October 24th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Iran - September 24th, 2009

Iran - September 24th, 2009

This orthorectified image shows part of the province of Kerman, in southeastern Iran. Many of the ridges visible here reach heights of about 1600 meters.

The ridges of Kerman province are the continuation of Iran’s central mountain ranges, which extend from Azarbaijan, branch out across the country’s central plateau, and terminate in Baluchestan.

Several small towns can also be seen at the foot of the mountains in the lower left corner. The largest of these is Zarand, with a population of about 30,000 people.