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Archive for October 3rd, 2009

Cloud Vortex Off Alaska-Canada Coast

56.9N 141.3W

October 3rd, 2009 Category: Clouds

Cloud vortex off coast of Alaska and Canada - September 23rd, 2009

Cloud vortex off coast of Alaska and Canada - September 23rd, 2009

A large cloud vortex swirls off the coasts of Alaska, USA, and Canada, near the Yukon and British Columbia Provinces. Most of the Canadian terrain is hidden beneath the clouds associated with the vortex.

However, some Alaskan land can be seen, including the snow-capped peaks of the Wrangell, Chugach and Saint Elias Mountains. The mouth of the Copper River can be spotted along the coast, spilling tan sediments into the Gulf of Alaska.

Wide-swath Image of Denmark and Northern Germany – October 3rd, 2009

56.9N 9.0E

October 3rd, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Denmark - August 29th, 2009

Denmark - August 29th, 2009

Hamburg, Germany

Hamburg, Germany

Danish coast

Danish coast

The main image here is an orthorectified wide-swath ASAR (radar) image of Denmark and northern Germany. The width of the swath is five times greater than that of a normal IMM image, making it possible to observe bigger areas.

One close-up focuses on the city of Hamburg, Germany, and the Elbe River flowing past it into the North Sea.

The other shows the Limfjord, a shallow sound in Denmark that separates the island of Vendsyssel-Thy from the rest of Jutland Peninsula. Approximately 180 kilometres long and of an irregular shape with several bays, narrowings, and islands, it extends from Thyborøn Channel on the North Sea to Hals on the Kattegat.

Dust Blowing Off Coast of New South Wales, Australia

36.2S 148.3E

October 3rd, 2009 Category: Dust Storms

Dust blowing off coast of Australia - September 29th, 2009

Dust blowing off coast of Australia - September 29th, 2009

Close-up of dust

Close-up of dust

Queensland and New South Wales, Australia, experienced a severe dust storm a week ago on September 23rd (click here for previous article). In these images, taken September 29th, dust can once again be seen blowing off the coast of New South Wales.

A number of prominent scientists around the world said that Australia’s recent travails — prolonged drought, devastating fires and now dust storms — are linked to climate change, which is making an arid continent’s environment far more disaster prone, reports the New York Times.

Although dust storms have hit eastern Australia for thousands of years, the current problem is that eastern Australia is in drought and a large amount of inland eastern Australia has been subject to some farming practices that have tended to degrade the native vegetation.

Eastern Australia has undergone major deforestation for pasture and crops which combined with the ongoing drought has left vegetation cover badly reduced. The exposed soil is vulnerable to the 100 km per hour winds that affected the region last week.